Kicking off a new season of Tech and...

Last years Tech and... series, produced in partnership with General Assembly and Greystone Technology, established a foundation for the events based on open -and sometimes raw- discussion about topics overlapping society and technology. Panelists discussed the impact of technology on healthcare, fashion, urban development, transportation, and food.

Designing for Consistent Cross-Channel Experience

Designing for Consistent Cross-Channel Experience

The human experience encompasses the entirety of interactions a person has with your organization -and your industry- regardless of channel used to deliver the interaction. Experiences delivered across multiple channels that have not been designed as a single cohesive experience are disjointed and confusing. In a commercial environment, this results in a poor customer experience. In government, non-profit, and healthcare, the effect can be devastating with vulnerable populations unable to make use of critical services.

The Rise of the Chief Anthropology Officer

The Rise of the Chief Anthropology Officer

As customer understanding becomes the most powerful sustainable competitive advantage, the comparative study of human societies and cultures and their development has become a core business competency. The ability to conduct qualitative ethnographic research, develop insights based on that research then translate those insights into business strategy is as important as the technology strategy the CTO is driving.

A (not so) Comprehensive List of Customer Journey Mapping Tools

A (not so) Comprehensive List of Customer Journey Mapping Tools

The primary tools for customer journey mapping are analog: whiteboards, butcher paper, post-it notes and markers are sufficient. The problem with these tools is that it is difficult to evolve the map that is created. For a customer journey map to grow with the organization it is necessary to transfer it to a digital medium so it can be built on over time. Unfortunately, there are not many purpose built solutions for moving your map beyond pen and paper.

Why do technology conferences still look like 1999?

Why do technology conferences still look like 1999?

We are finally acknowledging that technology itself is insufficient to solve problems. But until human behavior becomes a core part of the technology conversation -instead of relegated to user experience or marketing conferences- we are stuck with technology that looks like 2050 and usage and adoption that looks like 1999.

A Case for Complexity

A Case for Complexity

Our hyper-focus on the snippet, the blurb and the micro-moment is causing us to lose something. Entrepreneurs and companies quit trying to solve the hard problems. Solutions to hard problems are not easily communicated. They are not easily pitched. They are hard to sell. But those are the problems worth solving. They are complex. Likewise, the solutions are complex.

Business must act more like a laboratory and less like an assembly line.

We are in the middle of massive business, political and societal shifts. The situation goes beyond mere change. Change implies evolution in a predictable direction that can planned for and adapted to. The shifts we are experiencing are volatile, full of rapid, explosive, and sometimes random shifts coming from often unexpected directions. 

Marketing Automation Stack-on-a-Shoestring

Marketing Automation Stack-on-a-Shoestring

Automated full lifecycle customer engagement has become a necessity and not a luxury. Even small companies without the staff or money for a big enterprise system need the ability to monitor their brand and industry, automatically convert website visitors to email marketing candidates to sales opportunities and provide live, real-time sales support.

The Most Important Marketing Skill in 2016

The Most Important Marketing Skill in 2016

Almost every marketing related article I read over the last month focused on two key assertions:

  1. Technology is king and companies are investing heavily in technology in 2016
  2. Content is king and companies are investing heavily in content creation in 2016

Where is all that content going to come from?

If marketing organizations are staffing up with software developers and platform managers, who is going to develop the content?